Scan of old photo

This is a discussion on Scan of old photo within the Photoshop Playground forums, part of the PHOTO PROJECTS category; Those ocean-side series of protections are familiar Keith... :^) They did something similar alongside the main state road a few miles from where this subdivision ...


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Thread: Scan of old photo

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Spokane Wa
    Posts
    1,539
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    Those ocean-side series of protections are familiar Keith... :^)
    They did something similar alongside the main state road a few miles from where this subdivision is that's eroding.
    But here they're only protecting the main roads with the really expensive measures, they're letting the land around it rub away.... the subdivision protections
    would have to be covered by the county, while the main roads are state (much deeper pockets :^)

    ....And feel free to post what you'd like to Ranger! This is a great place to practice editing and a fun place to watch what everyone's
    coming up with!

  2. #12
    Senior Member
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    May 2009
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    PHOTO EDITING OK
    Quote Originally Posted by RangerNation View Post
    Those are great creative ideas on the photos guys, The one with the mirror effect thats a lot more then i would have thought of. Not bad for a 30+ year old picture i have someone others with sharper focus i am going on a hunt for some images. I have one that is a shot of myself when i was a kid that everyone in the family loves. It one of those shots that you need to be in the right place and the right time. I may pull the box out and scan again in a much much higher resolution its fairly sharp but i am sure its not as good as it could be since my parents always had the cheap 35 mm point and shoots and disposable's.

    Those ones you did are great, As for the clowns yeah they are not the greatest thing to have in the photos i do not have a fear for clowns but they are not the nicest looking thing to be images in my mind. I will have some more play images up as soon as i find the images on disk or re scan i will actually post those ones with absolutely no edits done to them just scan and post.
    Great its good to have something like these to work with .....

    I tend to like the old photos better for some reason .... seems in this digital age a lot more potential is possible with adjusting and changing things

    The higher the resolution the better - great glad you liked what we did so far too

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    5
    Those are abundant artistic ideas on the photos guys, The one with the mirror after effect that's a lot added again I would accept anticipation of. As for the clowns they are not the greatest affair to accept in the photos I do not accept a fear for clowns but they are not the nicest looking thing to be images in my mind.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    11
    pretty poor scan u might just want to rescan it!

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    NSW Australia
    Posts
    105
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    Fixed colour, Duplicated and took out some noise,clone out some stuff, add lighting, Dodge/Burn, Smooth out skin,frame.



    Nice pic to work with, Thanks for that was fun to work on.

    bigger pics get better results.

    Pete...
    For the invisible things of God, from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, [even] his eternal power and Godhead; so that we are without excuse:

  6. #16
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    May 2009
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    Great edit PCR 1968 ....

    I like the nice colours and smooth skin tones ....
    I could not get close to this quality .... and I did try ....

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1
    The main tool used to restore this photo was the rubber stamp tool in Photoshop 5.5. Even if you never want to tackle an image as bad as this, the rubber stamp is a tool you should learn to use. You may want to fix small areas with bad spots or remove powerline wires or other unsightly items from an otherwise nice photograph.

    I scanned the image at 600 dpi. The higher the resolution you scan at, the more pixels you have to work with. If you scan at 72 dpi you will have very few pixels and the changes you make will be much more noticible. If you need some basic information on scanning click here.

    Two tools you will use a lot are the hand tool and the zoom tool. You will constantly be zooming in and out.With a high resolution scan you will not see the full image on your screen
    Double click the zoom tool and it will reduce your image to 100%.
    Double click the hand tool and it will reduce your image to fit the screen.

    Open your photo and create a new blank layer above the original. Double click the rubber stamp tool and check the box that says all layers in the options palette. This will allow your changes to go to the new layer and your original will remain untouched.


    You will need to change brush sizes often. If you don't see your brushes palette go to window/show brushes.

    To begin zoom in on a damaged area. Hit your S key and the stamp tool will become active. What you want to do is copy or clone the good pixels over the damaged area.

    Hold down the ALT key and click on the area you want to copy with your mouse. When you release the alt key you will see a round circle that indicates the size of brush you are using. Click your mouse on the damaged area and drag. You will see a crosshair appear where you did the ALT/CLICK. This indicates the area that is being copied.

    You may want to click and drag or just click, move and click again. It takes some practice and experimenting to get good at this. You may want to constantly alt click and pick up new pixels to copy.


    Double click on one of the brushes and the brush options palette will open. Experiment with these settings to find what works best for you.


    I did one click and dragged the mouse in a straight line to demonstrate the difference in brush settings.



    Zoomed in at 400% this image shows what the result was using a brush hardness setting of 100. The edges are much too sharp to use on this area of the photo.



    This image shows the result when using a brush hardness setting of 0. You will want a hardness setting somewhere in between. A setting of 0 will usually be too blurry.


    Change your brush size often as you work on a bad area. This will help things blend together more evenly.

    If you do too much damage the first time and want to start over, just throw out the top layer and make a new one.

    To save time I traced around the image with the lasso tool and removed it from the bad background. It was much faster to create a new background than to repair the old.

    You may want to make selections around some areas before you change them with the rubber stamp tool. For instance, when you are working on an area of the face that is close to the hairline. You don't want any of the face color to get in the hair. Select the area with the lasso or another tool before you use the rubber stamp. Only the area you have selected will be changed. Hit CTRL H if you want to hide your selection. Sometimes you will forget that you have done this and wonder why your tools aren't working in another area. I do this all the time, so now it is habit, if something isn't working hit CTRL D and make sure no selections are active.
    bert likes this.

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    philippines
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    121
    this is very late but just the same, here is an edit i did.



  9. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    Scanning old photos is a great way to preserve memories and reduce clutter. When I convert old prints into digital pictures and store them on my computer, I get to see them more frequently. I also have more opportunities to share them with friends and family.


 
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