out of focus

This is a discussion on out of focus within the Photography Discussion forums, part of the PHOTO FORUM category; I have a sony a100 dslr and whenever i take a photo there are always quiet a lot of parts in my photos that are ...


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Thread: out of focus

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    I have a sony a100 dslr and whenever i take a photo there are always quiet a lot of parts in my photos that are out of focus.
    I tried putting IS on i also tried different lens and putting it on landscape because my tutor said if you shoot in landscape mode everything should be in focus "but even then its not"
    I tried putting the focus settings on to center right or wide and other settings but there is always atleast 3 or 4 points in the photo that is out of focus.

    The censor has been cleaned so have the lens and i just cant future it out. I believe there is another setting either aperture or shutter speed that could help bring more in to focus not sure which one. I may be wrong.

    I am going out shooting in a bit i will post a few samples of the out of focus images. I guess i just like everything in focus and to be sharp.


  • #2
    Senior Member
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    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    I'm not familiar with your brand of camera but it does sound like you have it set at a large aperture(small number) this would account for the shallow depth of field.

    I found an on-line review and found this extract...

    "The camera features 2 prominent control dialsne sets the camera shooting modes(aperture priority,shutter priority,manual modes) while the other one controls other functions. One main dial on the front of the camera is responsible for changing aperture and shutter speed and the directional control pad on the back is for using the menus and to change other settings"

    I think you need to sit down and go through your manual and find out how to get out of "Landscape mode" and find the aperture priority setting and then play about with one subject but going up and down through all the aperture values you have until you can recognise the type of effect that each setting will give you.When I was learning about dof this is exactly what I did and I took hundreds and hundreds of pictures...

    Good luck
    Karin


    Taking photos that please me, but if you like them too then it's a bonus!

  • #3
    R0B
    R0B is offline
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    Sony A77 + grip, Sony A200 + grip, Sony 16-50mm f/2.8, Sony 50mm f/1.8, Sony 18-70mm f/3.5-5.6, tokina 70-210mm f/4-5.6, 2 flashguns.
    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    Yeah sounds like your shooting with a too wide aperture, I use an a200, and all you have to do is switch the top dial to A (aperture priority) and set the aperture to a larger number, it'll slower your shutter speed, but more will be in focus...
    If that fails, then check to see make sure there are no fingerpints on both sides of your lens, and if that fails, then I can't help you

    With my total lack of graphic designing skills, I drew up a little diagram to show how aperture's relate to the depth of field for ya'
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    Sony A77, A200, Grips for both, 16-50 f/2.8, 50mm f/1.8, 18-70 f/3.5-5.6, 70-210 f/4-5.6, 2 flashguns.

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  • #4

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    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    You may want to read up on depth of field (and hyperfocal distance if you're doing landscape photos). This site gives a pretty good explanation: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials...th-of-field.htm, but I prefer this one for depth of field calculations: http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html.

    In the end, you'll find that the landscape, action, etc. modes work pretty well most of the time, but the beauty of having a camera like yours is having the power to choose the aperture, iso and shutter speed for the specific picture you want to take. For example, landscape mode will give you a narrow aperture (for large depth of field), but as you've seen, it may still not be enough to keep everything in the shot in focus (especially if there's something very close to you in the photo). Plus, just because you're shooting a landscape doesn't mean you necessarily want everything to be in focus, so perhaps you actually want a larger aperture. That will make a little more sense after you read the first article, by the way.

  • #5
    lost. always lost..
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    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    the area in focus is dependent on your aperture (the larger the number the more will be in focus) and the distance to where you're focusing. if you're focusing very closely to things like bugs then you'll have a harder time getting everything in focus than if you were focusing on something further away from you.

    generally i shoot landscapes at f/11 or higher and use a tripod. i shoot macros at f/11 and higher also. for weddings i shoot at f/2.8 or 3.5 due to the low light and manual focus.

    the image below was shot at f/16 on a tripod at iso 100 and whatever the shutter speed ended up being for a proper exposure. i used the dof button found on canon cameras (you might want to research to see if it's also on sony cameras) to check the dof prior to pressing the shutter. this makes the viewfinder dark at smaller aperture (large numbers like f/11 or 16), but lets you view exactly what is and isn't in focus. most of the time i don't bother figuring up the hyperfocal distance, that's only used when i can't get the foreground in focus easily due to how close it is to the lens.


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