Photoshoot

This is a discussion on Photoshoot within the Photography Discussion forums, part of the PHOTO FORUM category; I have my first paid photoshoot today at 4 pm (-5). I figured out pricing which the customer is happy with, yay! However. Just making ...


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Thread: Photoshoot

  1. #1
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    I have my first paid photoshoot today at 4 pm (-5). I figured out pricing which the customer is happy with, yay! However. Just making sure these photos turn out the best, I would like a reccomended setting to use. I know I'll have to fiddle with a few first before shooting and all, but it is a cloudy/overcast day. I was hoping for sunny, with some clouds to make everything happy looking (they're a happy family). It's being done at my property, which is 8 acres. Which setting do you think would work the best for an overcast day? Thanks.


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    I use a skylight filter on my lens when shooting on a cloudy day. I think it's MV Skylight. It brings out more blues that grey and brightens everything up a touch.

    Also, on my first few shoots I relied on just the "portrait mode" on my camera so I didn't have to worry and waste time on fiddling. When I work with people I know I use manual mode and make them suffer as I find the right settings.

    I think a light meter will help me with all that one day.

    I guess it's your comfort level. If you're pretty used to portraits and using manual mode then go for it!

    What lens you using?
    Heather

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    Laura get out there and take some test shots at the locations you are thinking of, if its going to be overcast all day then the light isn't going to change a great deal. so go check the light and see what shutter speeds you are going to get and whether you need to up the ISO a bit, both the lenses you have are not the fastest in the world so it would be good to find out what the light is going to be like.

    An e-book I have recommends setting the white balance to cloudy, and says of the portrait mode

    Portrait. First of the Digital Vari-Programs is Portrait mode, which is organized to focus on the subject, lower in-camera sharpening, lower contrast and saturation appropriately and let the background blur as much as is practical. If flash is permitted (you can disable it if you wish and shutter times will lengthen accordingly) shutter speed never lengthens beyond 1/60 sec. i While these qualities are fine for portraits, you can think of them as a group of settings to be used for any subject that might benefit from them. You can, after all, take portraits of things, animals and scenes if you plant one foot out of the box.

    The Nikon D80 manual recommends centre-weighted focusing for portraits.

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    Laura get out there and take some test shots at the locations you are thinking of, if its going to be overcast all day then the light isn't going to change a great deal. so go check the light and see what shutter speeds you are going to get and whether you need to up the ISO a bit, both the lenses you have are not the fastest in the world so it would be good to find out what the light is going to be like.

    An e-book I have recommends setting the white balance to cloudy, and says of the portrait mode

    Portrait. First of the Digital Vari-Programs is Portrait mode, which is organized to focus on the subject, lower in-camera sharpening, lower contrast and saturation appropriately and let the background blur as much as is practical. If flash is permitted (you can disable it if you wish and shutter times will lengthen accordingly) shutter speed never lengthens beyond 1/60 sec. i While these qualities are fine for portraits, you can think of them as a group of settings to be used for any subject that might benefit from them. You can, after all, take portraits of things, animals and scenes if you plant one foot out of the box.

    The Nikon D80 manual rcommends centre-weighted focusing for portraits.

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    Happee: I don't have a polarizing filter =( Wish I did. Usually when I shoot outside, I just put it on landscape. I'm using my 18-135 mm stock lense.

    Yorkshireman: I will take test shots for sure lol. I could try portrait, making sure my flash is turned off. I might put my boyfriend outside and take a few of him to see what works best lol.

    What does centre-weighted focusing reffer to?

    Thanks both of you =)

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    I have found that an overcast day can fool a camera set on "portrait mode" especially if the subjects are wearing something black. There is not much to reflect and get an accurate reading. The camera (at least the Canon I use) will pick the shutter speed first and then drop your f-stop way down. Giving you no DOF, if you are going for this then great, otherwise I would suggest using the AV mode. You can keep your DOF the way you want it for photographing a group of people and then the camera will choose the shutter speed for you. If it is not a shutter speed you are happy with, then you can change your ISO until it reaches something to you liking. Sometimes you can be surprised how bright it is even on an overcast day.
    I wouldn't worry about messing with setting during the shoot as long as you act confident about it. If you are looking worried like you don't know what your doing then the client can see that. Even if you don't have a clue you can say something like "alright I want to get things set just perfect let me take a few camera readings in this area. Lighting is always changing on us photographers, haha, sometimes I wish I could just move the clouds where I need them" Paying clients are paying for a nice portrait, but I feel that they are also paying for the great humor and personality of the photographer.
    Have fun!!
    Rachel
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  • #7
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    What does centre-weighted focusing reffer to?
    Laura the term is actually center weighted metering (my mistake) and determines where the camera takes its exposure reading from - see page 52 in the D80 manual where it recommends using center weighted metering for portraits.

    See page 29 and 30 for tips on using the focus mode.

    Due to the lack of time left I would set the camera to portrait mode and go shoot the boyfriend - not literally of course

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    Laura I've been doing some searching round looking for tips and tricks on portrait shots here is what I have found, remember these are only peoples suggestions:

    Shoot RAW+jpeg (best of both worlds I guess)

    Thes tips were from another site

    Most digital cameras have a portrait mode; it is usually indicated by an image of a head. Make sure this is selected. This alters the depth of field, blurring the background and drawing attention to your main subject. [

    To aid the cameras own settings for portraits, zoom in on your subject. (If your camera has digital zoom, avoid this as this just enlarges the pixels and you will lose much-needed definition.) You may have to move back slightly, but this will put the background further out of focus and enhance the detail on the sitter.

    Make sure you are shooting in plenty of light, natural being the most favourable. The light at the start and end of the day is best; midday sun can be harsh and unforgiving. Place the sun behind the subject to avoid squinting. This will also force your flash to activate to counter-balance the sun, adding highlights to the subjects’ face and eyes.

    Also check this link - http://lifehacker.com/software/photography...aits-159432.php

    Good luck - show us the results

    Make sure your cameras automatic red-eye reducer is activated. Some cameras do this on every shot, where as some need to be selected. It is usually indicated by an image of an eye. This makes the flash go off twice, causing the persons pupils to dilate and stop the appearance of red-eye.

    If possible use a tripod. This will enable you to set up the camera and leave it there whilst you adjust the human element of the shot! It also eliminates camera shake on an image where detail and focus is essential. If you don’t have a tripod, use any stable surface to hand. And don´t forget to take plenty of pics of the kids, they DO grow so fast!


    PS Some good points from photomagnate also

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    Rachel: Thanks bunches!

    Yorkie: I went and took pics of my bf. I had it on landscape, portrait, then the flower one.. all seemed to be basically the same. So I guess it will do alright then =) The sun did come out for a while today, but it went back to hiding behind the clouds again. 20 mins til the shoot, so we'll see if it brightens up again outside!

    And I'll DEFINETLY post the results!!!

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    Good luck girl!!! They'll be great
    Heather

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