Depth of Field Study

This is a discussion on Depth of Field Study within the Photography Discussion forums, part of the PHOTO FORUM category; A couple of forum members suggested that I share an "experiment" I recently undertook to better help me grasp the concept of DOF. The following ...


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  1. #1
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    A couple of forum members suggested that I share an "experiment" I recently undertook to better help me grasp the concept of DOF. The following is not earth shaking and probably boring to the old "pros." But, for novice photographers like myself, it was an interesting project; one from which I learned a great deal.

    With the purchase of my new lens, and while trying to describe to my husband "shallow depth of field," I decided to set up a Depth of field Study.

    I staged my project using a Monopoly game, selecting a player's piece and dice, and arranging them on the game board. The player's piece was approximately 6 inches from the camera lens and the first die about 1 1/2 inch from the player's peice; the second die approximately 1 1/2 inch from the first die.

    The camera was on a tripod and I used a shutter release cable. I used natural light and standard room lamps. EVERYTHING remained constant EXCEPT for a change in aperature. (I was in Aperature priority mode for the entire study.) The aperture was the VARIABLE.

    I took 23 images in this study but will not show all. However, one quickly sees the concept of DOF.

    While viewing the example from the study, one can ask several questions. "Why is the entire image not in focus?" "Is it the fault of the camera or the photographer that the image is not in focus?" "Which exposure do you like best?" "Does exposure change your perception of the image?" "Does exposure change the meaning or mood?" "Is one exposure bad or wrong and another exposure good or right?" "Are some exposures more artistic than others?"

    All of this is food for thought as one strives to improve in their photography journey. I would encourage other "novice" photographers to undertake a similiar study on their own. It is a GREAT LEARNING TOOL. (And, it really helped me explain to my husband DOF. )



    1.



    1/10; f/2.8

    2.



    1/5; f/4.0

    3.



    0.4; f/5.6

    4.



    0.6; f/8.0

    5.



    1; f.11.0

    Three more examples to follow in the next post.....


  • #2
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    And, as promised.....

    6.



    2.5; f/18.0

    7.



    5; f/22.0

    8.



    8; f32.0

    I know. After this, you'll never want to see another Monopoly piece again! However, I hope this experiment has inspired other novice photographers to experiment on their own to increase their understanding of DOF.

  • #3

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    Old Fire Guy instructed me to do the same thing when I first joined too.

    fun to experient sometimes.

  • #4

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    I loved seeing your tests on your blog. I was trying to play around today with this subject today. I'll need to find something that doesn't move so much though. LOL

    Good subject and examples.
    [b]Nikon D90*Nikon D40x * Nikon 18-55mm * Nikon 55-200 * Nikon 50mm 1.4
    My desire in photography is to capture the essence of life, to make others catch their breath at the purity of the moment captured, I'm still working on that.

  • #5
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    thanks Sue... this inspires me to do experiments myself.


  • #6
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    Excellent demonstration!


    “Try and penetrate with our limited means the secrets of nature and you will find that,
    behind all the discernible concatenations, there remains something subtle, intangible and inexplicable.
    Veneration for this force beyond anything that we can comprehend is my religion.”
    (Albert Einstein)



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