Photo Doen't Look the Same as on your Camera Preview

This is a discussion on Photo Doen't Look the Same as on your Camera Preview within the Photo Editing & Image Management forums, part of the PHOTO FORUM category; Sorry in advanced as I have seen this similar post somewhere but couldn't find it that is why I'm posting this one. Went on a ...


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: Photo Doen't Look the Same as on your Camera Preview

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    28

    Photo Doen't Look the Same as on your Camera Preview

    Sorry in advanced as I have seen this similar post somewhere but couldn't find it that is why I'm posting this one.

    Went on a shoot this past weekend and I took photos with my 18-55mm II no IS and Canon Xti. When I viewed the photos on my Xti preview screen they looked great but when I opened the actual view size on my mac some were blurry, very disappointed. Why is it? How can I avoid this besides bringing a tripod all the time? Is the lens to blame as well as my ability to keep the lens steady? As you are aware when a photo is shrunk smaller they always look better and clear than the original size. Would like to know what steps need to be taken as this is embarrassing when providing photos to the model and don't want to look bad and loose credibility for future projects. Reminder this is my first actual shoot, I'm a beginner. Thanks in advance for your help.

    SAMPLES (some are blurry, but 2 and 4 seem not to be as blurry as the other 3. Are 2 and 4 acceptable if I provide this quality to model) NOTE-1jpg-2jpg-3jpg-4jpg-5jpg are actual size

    http://www.mentegraphics.com/1.jpg
    http://www.mentegraphics.com/1small.jpg

    http://www.mentegraphics.com/2.jpg
    http://www.mentegraphics.com/2small.jpg

    http://www.mentegraphics.com/3.jpg
    http://www.mentegraphics.com/3small.jpg

    http://www.mentegraphics.com/4.jpg
    http://www.mentegraphics.com/4small.jpg

    http://www.mentegraphics.com/5.jpg
    http://www.mentegraphics.com/5small.jpg


  • #2
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Higham, South Yorkshire
    Posts
    29,002
    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    Firstly some of the links you posted don't work, the LCD screen on the back of the camera will in most cases produce a clear bright image, concentrated colour and light - if you are getting blurred shots then there could be lots of reasons, hand held is not an issue so long as the shutter speed is high enough. Your camera should have a zoom facility when viewing and so you can check your images at the time of shooting. If the shutter speed you are getting is reasonable then either there is a lot of hand shake ot maybe a fault with ther lens / auto focus - try manual focus.

  • #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    28
    Fixed problem with links.

    I try not to shake the camera but I guess still need to work on that. If I had an 18-55mm IS would that help more with getting more clearer pictures? As you can see not all the photos are blurred. If you're on a budget what other lens is better than the actual 18-55mm II I currently have? As I am not very familiar with the lens yet.

    What is considered to be descent image quality to provide to model/client, etc.? Would images 2 and 4 be acceptable?

  • #4
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    1,320
    Equipment
    Canon 5D mk II, EF 14mm f/2.8L II, TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II, EF 24-70mm f/2.8L, EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS, EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS, EF 135mm f/2L, EF 300mm f/2.8L IS, Speelite 430EX II, 5380EX II
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    I'm still seeing "404 not found" errors trying to view the linked images, so I can't take a look at the issues you're seeing.

    Image links aside... it's somewhat difficult to know how well an image turned out based on the preview of the image on the LCD screen. A tiny amount of blur won't be large enough to notice in a small image size but once enlarged to full screen or a large print the problem can become very obvious and quite distracting.

    Image stabilization (IS - as it's known on a Canon brand lens but the same technology has different names for other brands such as Nikon, Sigma, Tamron, Tokina, etc.) buys you a few "stops" worth of stability if the cause of the blur is the challenge of holding the camera steady while taking a photo at low shutter speeds. If the camera is steady but the subject was moving then IS won't help at all. e.g. if it's very dark outside and you're trying to take a photo of a non-moving object such as a building and the camera is on a tripod then you can leave the shutter open as long as necessary and still get a tack-sharp image. But if the subject is in motion you are going to see some blurring (btw... sometimes this is actually a good thing if your'e trying to take a photo which "implies" motion.)

    There's a general guideline as to how fast the shutter speed needs to be in order to avoid motion blur.

    That guideline (and it's a "guideline" vs. a "rule" because every photographer is a bit different when it comes to their ability to keep a camera steady for hand-held shot.) says that the shutter speed should be 1 / focal-length X crop-factor. Since you have a Canon XTi which has an APS-C size sensor, the crop-factor is 60% or 1.6. With your 18-55mm lens, if you are taking a photo at the 55mm end of the zoom the shutter speed should be (as a guideline... not a rule) 1 / 55 X 1.6 ... or 1/88th second (we'll round off and call that 1/90th). But if you change to the wide angle end of the zoom (18mm) then it's only 1 / 18 X 1.6 ... or 1/28.8 (we'll round off and call that 1/30th). That's quite a difference... 1/30th at the wide-angle end and yet 1/90th at the telephoto end... of the SAME lens on the same camera. You can extrapolate to see how much much longer lenses would require drastically faster shutter speeds. When your angle of view (in a long lens) is extremely narrow, then the slightest movement on your part translates into a huge perceived movement in the camera.

    Image Stabilization isn't always foolproof and quality varies. Usually it provides somewhere between 2 and 4 stops of stability (3 is very common). Meaning if the minimum shutter speed required in order to not see motion blur in hand-held photography was 1/125th, then 3 stops would bring that speed down to 1/15th (which is pretty amazing that you could shoot that slow and yet still have a stable image.)

    It doesn't always work as well as the marketing guys claim. If the shot _really_ counts... and I know I'm going to have to use a shutter speed down in that dangerously slow territory... then I use a tripod (the ultimate in image stabilization is giving the camera a solid foundation.)

    I did emphasize "guideline" rather than "rule" because this all assumes that even with IS enabled, that you are actually doing your best to be steady. On the opposite extreme, there are shutter speeds so fast (e.g. 1/500th or above) in which it just doesn't matter anymore. You could be jumping up and down on a trampoline while doing somersaults and snap photos that are still tack sharp.

    As for what's decent quality... that all depends on what you need to do with the image. If you're taking a photo to post on the side of a billboard (HUGE print) then even a tiny amount of blur will be extremely noticeable. If, on the other hand, you are taking a photo with intent to share it on a social media website (e.g. Facebook, flickr, etc.) then the somewhat small image size and low on-screen DPI means it will be much harder to notice small flaws. The bigger the output size... the easier it is to notice focus issues.
    Mindcrime121 likes this.
    Tim Campbell

  • #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Porterville, California
    Posts
    9
    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    The webpage cannot be found

  • #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    28
    This was sent to me by TCampbell, hopefully this will help someone as it helped me.

    A shutter speed of 1/60th is a bit too slow for hand-held shots at a 55mm focal length. The guideline is to take the focal length and multiple it by the camera's crop factor (your camera's crop factor is 1.6). 55 X 1.6 = 88. So the minimum shutter speed should be 1/88th of a second (you can't really set it to 1/88th so I'd round up to the next nearest shutter speed.) Modern digital cameras can do fractional shutter speeds but the next "standard" shutter speed up (if this were a manual film camera) would have been 1/125th. And remember... this the the guideline for the "minimum" speed. Faster is better.

    Photographers think about exposure values in terms of "stops". Typically these mean f-stops, however we'll use them generically to compare exposure values so even a change in shutter speed might be considered a "stop". Your camera allows for 1/3 stop increments. f-stops (focal ratio stops) are based on the powers of the square root of 2.

    The square root of 2 is 1.4142135623731... but of course we're not going to label that on the camera. They'd just label it as 1.4. You'll notice that on a lot of older cameras you'd see f-stops such as f/1.0, f/1.4, f/2, f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f/16, f/22, and f/32. If you look at those numbers you might notice a few patterns in them. This list is the order of FULL f-stops. Cameras also have fractional f-stops but they don't count as "full" f-stops. For example, f/3.5 is a fractional f-stop considered to be 1/3 stop below f/4 (f/4 is a standard full f-stop).

    First, it starts with 1 and every second value on the list is doubled (so you can see there's an f1, f/2, f/4, f/8, f/16, and f/32) and the values in the middle also double (f/1.4, f/2.8, f/5.6, f/11 -- which is a round off of f/5.6 doubled) and f/22.

    But the real secret is that f/1 is really the square root of 2 raised to the 0 power (any number raised to the 0 power is always 1). Next is f/1.4 (which is the square root of two -- 1.4 -- raised to the 1st power (itself)). Next is 2. If the square root of 2 is 1.4 (and some change) then the square root of 2 ... then squared, would just put you back at 2 again. Next is f/2.8 -- the square root of 2 raised to the 3rd power. And so on.

    The reason the square root of 2 is critically important is because of something called the inverse-square rule. Each time you change the focal ratio by one full stop then you are literally either DOUBLING or HALVING the amount of light that the camera lens collects at any moment in time. If you are shooting at f/11 then the next full-stop brighter would be f/8 and that collects twice as much light as f/11 (meaning you could cut the time that your shutter is open by 1/2 and collect the same amount of light. This is known as an "equivalent exposure"). If you then drop to the next full stop (f/5.6) you collect twice as much light again (or four times as much light as f/11) and could set your shutter speed to 1/4 of the time (this would take you from 1/60th to 125/th to 1/250th (technically it'd be 1/120th and 1/240th but to make the math easy camera companies always round to values that we humans have an easy time remembering.)

    An excellent book on the topic is "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. I highly recommend it (as do many others.)

    Check a website called: the-digital-picture.com He reviews gear for Canon cameras... MOSTLY lenses. He doesn't always review every single lens, but the majority of them will be listed. He also reviews 3rd party lenses for Canon cameras. Usually (but not always) when comparing a Canon lens to a 3rd party lens of roughly the equivalent focal length and ratio, the Canon branded lens will be better (sometimes only fractionally better... other times much better.)

    As for your 70-300... longer lenses are often darker lenses and as the amount of light is reduced the auto-focus sensors will struggle more to find accurate focus.

  • #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    28
    Thanks for your help Tcampbell.

    Another question.. I will be in an art gallery later today evening. The place is well lit but not very bright enough... it almost has that yellowish light. I currently don't have a flash unit but I would like to know if the built in flash is good enough to take descent pictures? Also would I need to go with a fast shutter speed or would I need to lower the shutter speed?

  • #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    109
    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    I suggest you try to use the ambient light. You can set the white balance or correct it in post. You can also use a higher ISO sensitivity. Some galleries do not allow flash photography. A tripod or even a monopod can help. Getting a 35mm or 50mm wide aperture lens would probably give you the best results.

    Paolo

  • #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    28
    Sorry did not mention that I only have a 18-55mm. It seems that I will need to take a tripod as my ability to keep the camera steady is lousy. If I go with higher ISO will that give me the noisy picture?

  • #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    109
    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    Yes, higher ISO will increase the noise in the picture. A 50mm lens is not that expensive. I'm a Nikon user so I do not have experience with this one Amazon.com: Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II Camera Lens: Camera & Photo but it would probably be giving you better results and it costs less than a good tripod.

    Paolo


  •  
    Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

    Remove Ads

    Sponsored Links

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  

    Similar Threads

    1. PREVIEW
      By lauratuttle73 in forum People Photography
      Replies: 0
      Last Post: 05-23-2011, 06:48 PM
    2. My first photo (with this camera)
      By IAphotog in forum B & W Photography
      Replies: 3
      Last Post: 11-03-2009, 06:41 AM
    3. Replies: 6
      Last Post: 04-10-2008, 09:51 AM
    4. Depth of Field preview button
      By omnishri in forum Photography Discussion
      Replies: 0
      Last Post: 05-21-2007, 01:05 AM
    5. Nikon D50 and exclusive preview
      By MOD in forum Digital Cameras, Lenses & Accessories
      Replies: 0
      Last Post: 04-20-2005, 07:12 AM

    Search tags for this page

    preview photo on camera

    Click on a term to search for related topics.