Model Portrait at Le Bridge

This is a discussion on Model Portrait at Le Bridge within the People Photography forums, part of the PHOTO GALLERIES category; I'm really apologize if my editing is far from perfection. This is my first time post a picture here, i really appreciate critique and input ...


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  1. #1
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    PHOTO EDITING OK

    Model Portrait at Le Bridge

    I'm really apologize if my editing is far from perfection.

    This is my first time post a picture here, i really appreciate critique and input you give to my picture. :cheer:

    #1

    Untitled by Yovandra, on Flickr

    #2

    Untitled by Yovandra, on Flickr

    Shoot using Canon 550D and 16-35 f2.8L II USM, and 2 Nissin Di866


  • #2
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    Canon 5D mk II, EF 14mm f/2.8L II, TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II, EF 24-70mm f/2.8L, EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS, EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS, EF 135mm f/2L, EF 300mm f/2.8L IS, Speelite 430EX II, 5380EX II
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    Thanks for posting and welcome to the forums.

    Since you've asked for critique, these are both great attempts, but I'll call your attention to a few points.

    #2 has the stronger composition, her head has a very gentile tilt toward her "high" shoulder. I might turn her body just *slightly* more full to the camera, but this is a great start. Two things come to mind.

    First, the flash is casting a strong shadow from her forearm onto her outfit. The light source needed to be diffused a bit to avoid this strongly defined shadow.

    Second, she's overexposed. It's not that the shot is over-exposed, so much as the model. Using flash in a studio is different than using a flash in an environmental setting and it also depends on the effect you're going for. The more you increase the flash power on your subject then the more you have to back-off the exposure, and that means the darker the rest of the photo will be (everything not illuminated by the flash). This results in the over-exposed model even thought the railing she is sitting on is extremely hard to see because of the darkness.

    This topic is called "flash contribution" in environmental flash photography and it's the percentage of light naturally available vs. the light added by your flash. If the ambient light is greater than your flash, than the shadows cast by ambient light will be seen and your flash will fill-in the shadows and decrease their intensity. If your flash is contributing most of the light then the shadows cast by your flash will be visible and the ambient light will try to fill in some of the shadows created by your flash. Playing with the balance or "flash contribution" will alter the look. In this photo you have a very high "flash contribution" which means very little of the ambient light could compete with the flash and expose in camera.

    #1 is a bit weaker on the posing and composition. She looks a bit stiff (almost like a robot pose). A more relaxed pose will give her a more effeminate and beautiful look. The lighting is completely from the left and better on her face and upper body, but her hair and lower body are lost in shadow and her thigh is cropped out of frame at an awkward spot. I'd either go for the full-frame body shot, or take a half-shot and show her only from the the waist and above. If you include her lower body then you'd want to improve the lighting and cropping in that region.

    Keep shooting!
    Tim Campbell

  • #3
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    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    Welcome to the forum from the UK

  • #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by TCampbell View Post
    Thanks for posting and welcome to the forums.

    Since you've asked for critique, these are both great attempts, but I'll call your attention to a few points.

    #2 has the stronger composition, her head has a very gentile tilt toward her "high" shoulder. I might turn her body just *slightly* more full to the camera, but this is a great start. Two things come to mind.

    First, the flash is casting a strong shadow from her forearm onto her outfit. The light source needed to be diffused a bit to avoid this strongly defined shadow.

    Second, she's overexposed. It's not that the shot is over-exposed, so much as the model. Using flash in a studio is different than using a flash in an environmental setting and it also depends on the effect you're going for. The more you increase the flash power on your subject then the more you have to back-off the exposure, and that means the darker the rest of the photo will be (everything not illuminated by the flash). This results in the over-exposed model even thought the railing she is sitting on is extremely hard to see because of the darkness.

    This topic is called "flash contribution" in environmental flash photography and it's the percentage of light naturally available vs. the light added by your flash. If the ambient light is greater than your flash, than the shadows cast by ambient light will be seen and your flash will fill-in the shadows and decrease their intensity. If your flash is contributing most of the light then the shadows cast by your flash will be visible and the ambient light will try to fill in some of the shadows created by your flash. Playing with the balance or "flash contribution" will alter the look. In this photo you have a very high "flash contribution" which means very little of the ambient light could compete with the flash and expose in camera.

    #1 is a bit weaker on the posing and composition. She looks a bit stiff (almost like a robot pose). A more relaxed pose will give her a more effeminate and beautiful look. The lighting is completely from the left and better on her face and upper body, but her hair and lower body are lost in shadow and her thigh is cropped out of frame at an awkward spot. I'd either go for the full-frame body shot, or take a half-shot and show her only from the the waist and above. If you include her lower body then you'd want to improve the lighting and cropping in that region.

    Keep shooting!
    Thank's Campbell for you're input about my picture. i wish you live here on jakarta, so i can come with you to learn some shooting technique. I'm really beginner and unexperienced about composing and lightning technique. I'm really confused about balancing ambient and my flash when on the field, there are many of picture is over or under exposure. Is there any trick or tips to know how connect u're metering, manual setting, and flash power input for balance exposure ?

    Quote Originally Posted by yorkshireman View Post
    Welcome to the forum from the UK
    Thanks yorkshireman


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