SUGGESTIONS????

This is a discussion on SUGGESTIONS???? within the People Photography forums, part of the PHOTO GALLERIES category; Hi all. no photos to share but I need some advice. I'm shooting a live gig tonight and am as yet unsure of lighting conditions. ...


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Thread: SUGGESTIONS????

  1. #1
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    Hi all.

    no photos to share but I need some advice.

    I'm shooting a live gig tonight and am as yet unsure of lighting conditions.

    Is there some kind of filter I can get for situations like low light but with stage lighting?

    Or is it best to just shoot at ISO 1600 and no flash or would my speedlite be beneficial?

    Ive shot major concerts as a spectator in a large stadium but not so much in a small venue!

    Im sure Ill work it out but just wanted advice

    Thanks!
    Cazz

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  • #2

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    I'd use my speedlite. You should be able to bounce the flash when you're inside.
    Nikon Shooting, Lightroom Using Photography Chick.

  • #3
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    Maybe... but don't forget that bouncing generally requires a surface to bounce off of. Most stage settings have high ceilings (unless you're in a small club), and they may also not be a neutral color surface so your photos can take on a color cast. Just things to be aware of.

    I guess it depends on the environment, right? Will there be a light show? Often, timed right, you can get great band photos with the available light. A little noise at the higher ISO isn't really a big deal.

    But don't be afraid to pop the flash either, just remember you'll probably overpower the stage light for the nearest performer and not for the people further away.

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  • #4

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    utilize a flash; if you can sync multiple flashes - great
    if no ceiling bounce available, try a bounce card or a diffuser

  • #5
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    As I'm posting this reply the day after you had the shoot, I hope it went well for you. Let us know what you ultimately used.

    I'd 2nd Gruen's comment... few venues have a ceiling that's good for using bounce (usually they're black or very dark).

    I think my first option would be to use a 2nd (synchronized) flash as a sidelight (but that requires an assistant to hold the light -- usually held up on a mono-pod to get it higher and off to the side). If it's just you, then a bounce card or diffuser would probably improve the light a bit.

    I'd also 2nd Mario's comment.... don't be afraid of a little image noise. Although I think Photoshop isn't very good at reducing noise (and that's being polite about I *really* think), there are some Photoshop plug-ins that are great at cleaning up noise.
    Tim Campbell

  • #6
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    Thanks guys.

    It was a dingy little basement room with hardly any light but I think I managed to get some pretty great shots. I did have to use my speedlite and also ISO 1600(cant wait to get my new camera)

    I will share some soon

    Cazz
    Cazz

    Canon 40D & Tamron 18 - 270mm lens & Canon 580x II Speedlight and a lot of enthusiasm

    When responding to signatures, I'll give my uneducated, self taught opinion and respect that your hard work and fun went into producing the images you share. Please feel free to take everything I say with a grain of salt

    http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4070/...2269f814_m.jpg

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  • #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Hardy View Post
    Cazz,

    I used to do a bit of live shooting when I was still living in a tour bus 200 days out of the year, touring all around whoknowswhere haha... If you want to separate your shots from a lot of other live stuff, here's a ridiculously simple technique I used to use quite a bit...

    Set your camera to 'bulb' (keep bumping your shutter speed down until the lcd reads BULB'...
    Take a speedlight in hand, and fire it using the 'test' button.
    What you've got going on now is an opportunity to freely light your subject from whichever angle you can reach, while still maintaining the ability to compose the subject however you may wish to...
    The reason for having the camera set to bulb is to allow time for the flash to fire, and you'll get some pretty sweet light streaks and such too. I suggest trying this method out well before the show gets started. The technique takes some tinkering, but when done correctly, you'll have your subject properly exposed and a 'ghosting' if you will of any movement thats taken place while the shutter has remained open. I suggest shaking the camera a bit after you've fired the speedlight to get some light streaks to emphasize motion.

    Once you've got the technique down, and find yourself with a collection of photos taken using this method, you'll be happily surprised to find the images have far more latitude in terms of processing than they would otherwise have using other methods of capture.

    For me, it was the only way to do it. In the past I messed with trying to persuade even the most powerful speedlights in my bag to cooperate, never happened. This method allows for iso's in the 50-100 range so your working with a grain free image. However, due to the speedlight's pop, you time freeze and generally end up with that moment being the most impacting element in the shot - with the light streaks and blurs just being accents.

    After playing (and shooting) in literally 1000's of venues, I just got sick of the hardships of live photo through means of conventional methods and hence getting "conventional" and "Yep. Thats a live photo. okay, whats next" sort of photos. This technique ended up paying off a bit.

    Here's a sample shot done using that aforementioned technique. Cut me some slack on the horrific processing haha... It was taken while on one of our first tours, several years back, and I think the crappy processing speaks for how old this image is.
    http://i52.tinypic.com/119wdit.jpg

    Hope this helps.

    Brad

  • #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Hardy View Post
    Cazz,

    I used to do a bit of live shooting when I was still living in a tour bus 200 days out of the year, touring all around whoknowswhere haha... If you want to separate your shots from a lot of other live stuff, here's a ridiculously simple technique I used to use quite a bit...

    Set your camera to 'bulb' (keep bumping your shutter speed down until the lcd reads BULB'...
    Take a speedlight in hand, and fire it using the 'test' button.
    What you've got going on now is an opportunity to freely light your subject from whichever angle you can reach, while still maintaining the ability to compose the subject however you may wish to...
    The reason for having the camera set to bulb is to allow time for the flash to fire, and you'll get some pretty sweet light streaks and such too. I suggest trying this method out well before the show gets started. The technique takes some tinkering, but when done correctly, you'll have your subject properly exposed and a 'ghosting' if you will of any movement thats taken place while the shutter has remained open. I suggest shaking the camera a bit after you've fired the speedlight to get some light streaks to emphasize motion.

    Once you've got the technique down, and find yourself with a collection of photos taken using this method, you'll be happily surprised to find the images have far more latitude in terms of processing than they would otherwise have using other methods of capture.

    For me, it was the only way to do it. In the past I messed with trying to persuade even the most powerful speedlights in my bag to cooperate, never happened. This method allows for iso's in the 50-100 range so your working with a grain free image. However, due to the speedlight's pop, you time freeze and generally end up with that moment being the most impacting element in the shot - with the light streaks and blurs just being accents.

    After playing (and shooting) in literally 1000's of venues, I just got sick of the hardships of live photo through means of conventional methods and hence getting "conventional" and "Yep. Thats a live photo. okay, whats next" sort of photos. This technique ended up paying off a bit.

    Here's a sample shot done using that aforementioned technique. Cut me some slack on the horrific processing haha... It was taken while on one of our first tours, several years back, and I think the crappy processing speaks for how old this image is.
    http://i52.tinypic.com/119wdit.jpg

    Hope this helps.

    Brad

  • #9
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    Hi Cazz, sorry I didn't see this post on the day you sent it and I hope you did ok on the night, Brad has some excellent advise for you there.
    What I tend to do is use flash and use it as a fill in rather than bounce off walls and roofs, so I use a pop up white bounce, I also try to get in and shoot as close as possible, but I do tell the bands I am shooting that this is my plan and to expect a flash (usually on a low setting) going off in their face, of course they are ok with this as it produces a decent image for them and after all they all want good pics so they don't mind!
    Looking forward to seeing the images (have you posted them yet?)

  • #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Hardy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Hardy View Post
    Cazz,

    I used to do a bit of live shooting when I was still living in a tour bus 200 days out of the year, touring all around whoknowswhere haha... If you want to separate your shots from a lot of other live stuff, here's a ridiculously simple technique I used to use quite a bit...

    Set your camera to 'bulb' (keep bumping your shutter speed down until the lcd reads BULB'...
    Take a speedlight in hand, and fire it using the 'test' button.
    What you've got going on now is an opportunity to freely light your subject from whichever angle you can reach, while still maintaining the ability to compose the subject however you may wish to...
    The reason for having the camera set to bulb is to allow time for the flash to fire, and you'll get some pretty sweet light streaks and such too. I suggest trying this method out well before the show gets started. The technique takes some tinkering, but when done correctly, you'll have your subject properly exposed and a 'ghosting' if you will of any movement thats taken place while the shutter has remained open. I suggest shaking the camera a bit after you've fired the speedlight to get some light streaks to emphasize motion.

    Once you've got the technique down, and find yourself with a collection of photos taken using this method, you'll be happily surprised to find the images have far more latitude in terms of processing than they would otherwise have using other methods of capture.

    For me, it was the only way to do it. In the past I messed with trying to persuade even the most powerful speedlights in my bag to cooperate, never happened. This method allows for iso's in the 50-100 range so your working with a grain free image. However, due to the speedlight's pop, you time freeze and generally end up with that moment being the most impacting element in the shot - with the light streaks and blurs just being accents.

    After playing (and shooting) in literally 1000's of venues, I just got sick of the hardships of live photo through means of conventional methods and hence getting "conventional" and "Yep. Thats a live photo. okay, whats next" sort of photos. This technique ended up paying off a bit.

    Here's a sample shot done using that aforementioned technique. Cut me some slack on the horrific processing haha... It was taken while on one of our first tours, several years back, and I think the crappy processing speaks for how old this image is.
    http://i52.tinypic.com/119wdit.jpg

    Hope this helps.

    Brad
    How interesting Brad I am going to try this not only for stage work but in general! My only concern is pissing people off with the flash how have you dealt with that?
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