2 must have filters

This is a discussion on 2 must have filters within the Filters forums, part of the Photography Tips category; a skylight to at least protect your lens, and a polarizer...


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  1. #1
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    a skylight to at least protect your lens, and a polarizer
    say cheeseburger!!!

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  • #2

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    Don't waste money on a 'quality' or 'brand name' skylight filter.
    Buy several of the cheapest you can get.
    Then, when it eventually gets dirty, don't even try to clean it.
    Just trash it and use a new one.

    This is also great if you are working in a very dusty or muddy environment.
    If your skylight filter gets dirty halfway through your session, just drop it like an empty ammo clip and screw on a new one.

    Boy Scout photographers are always prepared.

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  • #3
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    Don't waste money on a 'quality' or 'brand name' skylight filter.

    Only one problem I see with this. Subpar filters add to loss of details. Why cover your good glass with cheap filters? While I understand the logic that you suggest, it just doesn't make sense to me. One of the main reasons for a filter is to protect the glass. I would rather replace a $100 filter than to replace a $1000 lens. But I also don't want to lose the quality of that lens...
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  • #4
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    Don't waste money on a 'quality' or 'brand name' skylight filter.
    Buy several of the cheapest you can get.

    Extremely bad idea. Calnumismatist is correct, you don't ruin the image quality of good glass with a cheap filter.
    John B


  • #5
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    The Hoya Pro Super HMC UV filters provide almost 100% light transmission - I have always bought the best I can afford which has usually been top of the line Hoya and have never had to throw one away.

    Also bear in mind the mechanics of a good filter and a bad in particular the CPL's which you need to rotate smoothly and not jam and fall apart.

    The difference between a cheap filter and a good one is marginal compared to the cost of the lens. Also you may not find the ultra slim ones (for wide angle lenses) in the cheaper range.


  • #6
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    Using cheap filters is a terrible idea. An optical system is only as good as its weakest link and if you stick a cheap and nasty filter on the front of your lens then you've immediately reduced your expensive, high quality lens to the optical performance of a cheap and nasty filter.

    I would argue the suggestion of a skylight filter as a general protection filter. Skylight filters are designed to

    "Reduces excessive bluishness that frequently occurs in outdoor color
    photography, especially in open shade under a clear, blue sky. The
    absorption peak is in the range which corresponds to the film’s green
    spectrum."

    They therefore do alter the colour of the image. A clear protector or UV filter is a better choice if lens protection is all you're after.

  • #7

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    My 2 faves are a slim circular polarizer and a 2-stop ND filter.

  • #8
    Hub
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    What can I say. Calnumismatist is correct and Cadwell summed it up perfectly.

    Yes, there is a yellow component to a skylight filter to absorb some blue transmitted light (giving a warming effect to the image). So use a high quality UV filter for general protection.

    One other consideration for the permanent attachment of a UV filter are the delicate coatings on the front element of your lens that are designed to minimize specific lens aberrations. These coatings are affected by both moisture and atmospheric contaminants.

    Finally a thought about polarizing filters. They are often overused or more importantly misused. They are intended to reduce polarized light period. The most typical example is the beautiful deep blue skies that can result from the use of a polarizing filter. Why? Because most of what we see as sky is actually light that has been polarized (photons vibrating in only one direction) by striking minute water droplets in the atmosphere. Reduce this polarized light and we see through the glare of the sky to reveal the true deep blue.

    Using a polarizing filter in other situations, like nighttime panoramas containing city lights, is generally non-effective. City lights are not composed of polarized light. In these cases, all that was accomplished was to reduce the amount of light striking the camera's sensor and to ultimately require decreasing the shutter speed or selecting a wider aperture.

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  • #9
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    I've had a UV for c. 20 years and have probably cleaned it at least 300 times; if a filter cost $10 (it doesn't), that would be $3000...

  • #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by knestle View Post
    Don't waste money on a 'quality' or 'brand name' skylight filter.
    Buy several of the cheapest you can get.
    Then, when it eventually gets dirty, don't even try to clean it.
    Just trash it and use a new one.

    This is also great if you are working in a very dusty or muddy environment.
    If your skylight filter gets dirty halfway through your session, just drop it like an empty ammo clip and screw on a new one.

    Boy Scout photographers are always prepared.
    What?

    Im a non filter guy and would only use a circular polarizing lens when the situation calls for it but, putting cheap filters (to decrease your pic quality) and then throw them away??? I thought I heard it all, I guess I was wrong! LOL!

    Sorry from bringing this from the dead but, boy I had to say something!


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