120 film

This is a discussion on 120 film within the Film Photography Equipment forums, part of the FILM PHOTOGRAPHY FORUM category; I've been using Kodak T-max in my medium format camera. Recently, I've been offered a good deal on some Kodak Tri-x pan, Ilford Delta Pro ...


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Thread: 120 film

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    3
    I've been using Kodak T-max in my medium format camera. Recently, I've been offered a good deal on some Kodak Tri-x pan, Ilford Delta Pro and IlfordHP- Plus and Fujifilm Neopan. I'm wondering what differences I can expect from these films or if I should even try these films.


  • #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    6
    I don't know about the rest, but, I'm pretty sure the case between T-max and Tri-X is, T-max is a consumer film, and Tri-x is more of a professional B&W film. Tri-x used to be the standard 400asa B&W film, pro and consumer. Then along came T-max which you can get a Wal-Mart. I'd say if you're getting a good deal on Tri-x, go for it!

  • #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    1,383
    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    In my opinion you can't beat 120mm ilford or fuji......

    simon.

  • #4

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    Sep 2007
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    I don't know about the rest, but, I'm pretty sure the case between T-max and Tri-X is, T-max is a consumer film, and Tri-x is more of a professional B&W film. Tri-x used to be the standard 400asa B&W film, pro and consumer. Then along came T-max which you can get a Wal-Mart. I'd say if you're getting a good deal on Tri-x, go for it!
    hey all

    First thing's first: this is my first post on this forum. So howdy :-)

    My understanding is that Tri-X is one of Kodak's "classic" emulsions, using traditional granular silver, introduced in the '50s I think. It was common for b/w photojournalism. T-Max is more recent, I think '70s-'80s era; the "T" stands for "tabular" referring to flat grains of silver which is supposed to increase light sensitivity. The result is that a given speed of T-max is supposed to be less grainy than the equivalent ISO of a regular film like Tri-X.

    It's been a while since I've regularly shot b/w film, but I used to use Tri-X a lot. The few times I used T-Max it did seem to have incredibly fine grain. Depends on what look you're into.

    cheers

    Billy S.

  • #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    7
    Incidentally, keep in mind that my experience with both Tri-X and T-Max was in 135, not 120.

    cheers,

    Billy S.


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