NEWBIE: Shutter speed, aperture, exposure and iso in relation to each other

This is a discussion on NEWBIE: Shutter speed, aperture, exposure and iso in relation to each other within the Exposure (ISO, Shutter Speed, Aperture) forums, part of the Photography Tips category; Originally Posted by siodre check out this site: http://www.photonhead.com/simcam/ not much reading involved, but a simulation of how different exposure settings interact with each other. ...


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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by siodre View Post
    check out this site:
    http://www.photonhead.com/simcam/

    not much reading involved, but a simulation of how different exposure settings interact with each other.
    Wow that is a really helpful tool, thanks!

  2. #12

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    hey ...
    i needed to know about the aperture settings.
    i am aware of the effects of the aperture settings..but then its mostly hit and trial incase of blurring or taking the background in the picture.

    i wanted to know how to adjust the aperture according to the need of the picture..
    for eg. i want to capture two big stones kept at a distance ..sat abt 5 feet...how much shud be the aperture so i can get teh focus absolutely right ?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rendersoul View Post
    hey ...
    i needed to know about the aperture settings.
    i am aware of the effects of the aperture settings..but then its mostly hit and trial incase of blurring or taking the background in the picture.

    i wanted to know how to adjust the aperture according to the need of the picture..
    for eg. i want to capture two big stones kept at a distance ..sat abt 5 feet...how much shud be the aperture so i can get teh focus absolutely right ?
    You should probably check out this site: http://www.dofmaster.com/doftable.html

    Aperture controls the amount of light which can pass through the lens at a time. It also controls the width of the "depth of field". Depth of field (often abbreviated DoF) is the range at which objects will seem to be more-or-less acceptably focused (even if they aren't precisely focused the softness will be too slight for most people to notice.) Very high focal ratios (e.g. f/16, f/22, f/32) have extremely wide depths of field. Very low focal ratios (f/1.4, f/2.0, f/2.8) have very narrow depth of fields. At f/1.4, a portrait of a person's face (head & shoulders shot) would not even have the person's entire head in focus (you'd maybe have their eyes focused sharply but their ears would be blurred.) The same shot at f/16 would be completely sharp.

    So the question about the rocks doesn't have enough information to give an answer. It would depend on how large these rocks are (larger than a human head?) and also whether the rocks are at the same distance (side-by-side) vs. one near and one far. This is what is meant by "depth" in the phrase "depth of field".

    In the "old days" of film, every lens had depth-of-field range marks on the lens body located next to the focus ring. For example, on my (it just happens to be sitting near me) old Canon AE-1 with a 50mm lens, I see that if I focus the lens to 5', the DoF marks for f/4 are very narrow... basically things from about 4'10" to about 5'4" would seem focused and that's about it. But if I change the aperture to f/16 then everything from 4' to 7' will be focused.

    Unfortunately, modern lenses for DSLRs no longer have these marks -- with few exceptions (I have an EF 14mm f/2.8L lens that still has them but that is the _only_ lens I've personally seen in recent years that still has them. And probably the only reason it has them is because wide angles are usually used for landscape photography and in landscape photography you usually want to manually focus the lens to something known as the "hyper-focal distance" (this is the distance at which the maximum possible depth of field will be created) -- which is very easy to find if the lens has these marks.

    The dofmaster.com website has various tools (online, or downloadable to a computer or even downloadable to a phone, or tablet.)
    Tim Campbell


 
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