exposure and aperature

This is a discussion on exposure and aperature within the Do's and Dont's forums, part of the Photography Tips category; im new to shooting outside of just for fun. and i really want to learn to shoot shots correctly. i am however lacking in how ...


Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1
    im new to shooting outside of just for fun. and i really want to learn to shoot shots correctly. i am however lacking in how to properly set my exposure levels. iso and aperture are new to me. is there an easy way to understand these two?


  • #2
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    16,727
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    I highly recommend this book.


    “Try and penetrate with our limited means the secrets of nature and you will find that,
    behind all the discernible concatenations, there remains something subtle, intangible and inexplicable.
    Veneration for this force beyond anything that we can comprehend is my religion.”
    (Albert Einstein)


  • #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, Calif
    Posts
    1,231
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    I highly recommend this book.
    Me too!
    Colleen

    Sony a700
    Sony 18-70 3.5-5.6 kit lens
    Sony 16-35 2.8 Carl Zeiss
    Sony 85mm 1.4 Carl Zeiss
    Sony 50mm 1.4
    Sony 75-300 4.5-5.6
    Sony HVL-F36AM flash
    Alien Bee's B1600, AB800
    Some soft Boxes
    LR3 & CS4

  • #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Jensen Beach, Florida
    Posts
    929
    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    Peterson's companion book "Understanding Shutter Speed" is also well worth reading.
    John B


  • #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wilmington, DE
    Posts
    1,246
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    I've read them both and they are excellent at explaining without overwhelming you.
    Olympus E-30 & E-520 ~ 14-42mm ~ 50 - 200mm ~ OM 50mm f/1.8 ~ Sigma 18 - 50mm f2.8

  • #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Alexandria, VA
    Posts
    156
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    I've read them both and they are excellent at explaining without overwhelming you.

    I agree. The understanding exposure book is very easy to read and follow. It is also easy to find a topic if you need to refer back to something. It is instock at many book stores I have been to, so no ordering involved.
    ~Elizabeth

    Nikon D90
    Nikon D40
    Lenses: Nikon 50mm f/1.8 AF; Nikon 18-55mm AF-S; Nikon 55-200mm VR AF-S, Nikon 18-105mm VR


    My Photobucket Albums

  • #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kirriemuir, AB, Canada
    Posts
    83
    Equipment
    Canon 5D, 7D, G1X, and many L lenses.
    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    You might find the SimCam helpful. It lets you experiment with shutter speed and aperture:

    http://www.photonhead.com/simcam/shutteraperture.php

    ...ISO settings:

    http://www.photonhead.com/simcam/filmspeed.php

    ...and see how you get camera shake in your images:

    http://www.photonhead.com/simcam/camerashake.php

    Take careful note of how, as the aperture increases in size, the depth-of-field (zone of acceptable focus) gets narrower from front to back. The choice of aperture will become one of your prime compositional tools when deciding what you want to keep in the photo and what you want to minimize.

    You may also find these free online videos helpful:

    http://www.expertvillage.com/video/7620_ph...-proportion.htm
    http://www.expertvillage.com/video/90356_l...depth-field.htm

    Best,

    Sean M.
    The Neutral Hills
    Where photographers roam

    McCormick Photography

    Landscape and fine art photography

  • #8
    Hub
    Hub is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    2,881
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    Well..................................

    I highly recommend the Hub's series of photographic primer blogs designed just for the beginning DSLR user as shown below. He sits and slaves over a hot Macintosh to ensure each that new chapter is beginner-friendly and knowledge packed.

    Hub (naturally)
    "There was once a time when Ansel Adams knew nothing about photography. There's hope for all of us."
    Visit Hub's Photo Educational & News Sites

    Hub's Camera -- For the beginning DLSR User
    Hub's iDarkroom -- For starting in the digital darkroom
    Hub's Photo Tips -- General Tips for beginning DLSR User
    Hub's Visionary Photographers -- Images and words of wisdom from today's elite photographers
    Hub's Rising Stars of Photography -- Promoting the art and careers of today's emerging photographers
    The Portland Metro Photographic News -- All Things Photographic in Oregon and Washington

  • #9
    Hub
    Hub is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    2,881
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    Melly,

    You got the relationship correct. Now do you understand what impact going either of these directions (opening or closing the aperture) has on depth of field? If so, then you are at a good place to start experimenting with your depth of field options.

    Hub
    "There was once a time when Ansel Adams knew nothing about photography. There's hope for all of us."
    Visit Hub's Photo Educational & News Sites

    Hub's Camera -- For the beginning DLSR User
    Hub's iDarkroom -- For starting in the digital darkroom
    Hub's Photo Tips -- General Tips for beginning DLSR User
    Hub's Visionary Photographers -- Images and words of wisdom from today's elite photographers
    Hub's Rising Stars of Photography -- Promoting the art and careers of today's emerging photographers
    The Portland Metro Photographic News -- All Things Photographic in Oregon and Washington

  • #10
    Hub
    Hub is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    2,881
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    Melly,

    Depth of field is the TOTAL distance that is in focus at any given f/stop -- from the object closest to you to the object furthermost from you that is in focus. At wide apertures (smaller f/stop numbers) the TOTAL distance that is in focus is smaller than at small aperture opening (large f/stop numbers).

    Depth of field changes both in front and behind your subject as the f/stop increase or decreases. Depth of field increases faster behind your subject as you decrease the size of your aperture opening (going to smaller f/stop number) -- by approximately 2/3rds.

    Try re-reading the article with this in mind and see if it makes more sense. Then try experimenting with different f/stops with your camera to "see" the effect in your own pictures.

    Hope this helps.

    Hub
    "There was once a time when Ansel Adams knew nothing about photography. There's hope for all of us."
    Visit Hub's Photo Educational & News Sites

    Hub's Camera -- For the beginning DLSR User
    Hub's iDarkroom -- For starting in the digital darkroom
    Hub's Photo Tips -- General Tips for beginning DLSR User
    Hub's Visionary Photographers -- Images and words of wisdom from today's elite photographers
    Hub's Rising Stars of Photography -- Promoting the art and careers of today's emerging photographers
    The Portland Metro Photographic News -- All Things Photographic in Oregon and Washington


  •  

    Remove Ads

    Sponsored Links

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •