When do you "rectify" building slant

This is a discussion on When do you "rectify" building slant within the Composition forums, part of the Photography Tips category; Here's a question similar to "fixing the horizon". When should you adjust the tilt of buildings caused by perspective? PhotoShop does a resonable job of ...


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    3,005
    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    Here's a question similar to "fixing the horizon". When should you adjust the tilt of buildings caused by perspective? PhotoShop does a resonable job of this and there are a few plugins that help twist the building back into a more "realistic" looking building.

    You know what I mean ? Those buildings that look like they're falling over backward or crashing together in the center (caused when taking a photo toward the ground when you're up high).

    I lean toward (no pun intended but it works) starightening the building when the building is the primary subject. But even then, those photos looking up at a glass skyscrapper won't look right rectified.

    I was criticized on the Alamy forums for not straightening (enough) buildings in travel pictures.

    Any thoughts about this.

    Charles
    I currently spend a fair amount of time on Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/103236949470535942612

    my personal website (not very current I'm afraid): clupica and family
    my photogarphy : cwlupica - Photograher
    my photos on SmugMug. StudioLupica on SmugMug
    me on facebook: Charles Lupica
    My fan page on facebook: StudioLupica


  • #2
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    16,727
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    Charles, I've been accused on numerous occasions of having some level of OCD - I am just not a fan of converging verticals MOST of the time. I can see it as a creative tool on occasion, but invariably I attempt to correct the distortion and get my parallel lines back.


    “Try and penetrate with our limited means the secrets of nature and you will find that,
    behind all the discernible concatenations, there remains something subtle, intangible and inexplicable.
    Veneration for this force beyond anything that we can comprehend is my religion.”
    (Albert Einstein)


  • #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Cochranton, Pa.
    Posts
    8,081
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    Charles, I've been accused on numerous occasions of having some level of OCD - I am just not a fan of converging verticals MOST of the time. I can see it as a creative tool on occasion, but invariably I attempt to correct the distortion and get my parallel lines back.
    ditto

  • #4
    Hub
    Hub is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    2,881
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    Charles,

    Not sure there is a right or wrong answer to this question. It more likely depends on your interpretation of the subject. Although keystoning or line convergence is usually avoided and corrected by architectural photographers, others find the distortion to be an integral part of their composition.

    It's another compositional judgment a photographer has to make. Kind of a wishy-washy answer, but it seems to be the reality.

    Hub
    "There was once a time when Ansel Adams knew nothing about photography. There's hope for all of us."
    Visit Hub's Photo Educational & News Sites

    Hub's Camera -- For the beginning DLSR User
    Hub's iDarkroom -- For starting in the digital darkroom
    Hub's Photo Tips -- General Tips for beginning DLSR User
    Hub's Visionary Photographers -- Images and words of wisdom from today's elite photographers
    Hub's Rising Stars of Photography -- Promoting the art and careers of today's emerging photographers
    The Portland Metro Photographic News -- All Things Photographic in Oregon and Washington

  • #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Lawrence, KS
    Posts
    186
    Quote Originally Posted by clupica View Post
    I was criticized on the Alamy forums for not straightening (enough) buildings in travel pictures.
    Some folks like making up rules. Only you can decide if you have any obligation to follow them. Do what you think looks best. Sometimes I straighten stuff, sometimes I leave it alone, and sometimes I intentionally warp stuff. Mainly just to tweak off the camera clubber crowd.

    "I don’t use an exposure meter. My personal advice is: Spend the money you would put into such an instrument for film. Buy yards of film, miles of it. Buy all the film you can get your hands on. And then experiment with it. That is the only way to be successful in photography. Test, try, experiment, feel your way along. It is the experience, not technique, which counts in camera work first of all. If you get the feel of photography, you can take fifteen pictures while one of your opponents is trying out his exposure meter." -Alfred Eisenstaedt

  • #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    314
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    The fact that all postprocessing programs have some form of distortion and perspective correction indicate that those are problems that need to be corrected in any photo with those issues.

    Cameron

  • #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    701
    Equipment
    I use 35mm film, instant film and digital cameras
    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    If the distortion bothers you enough, correct it. However, by doing so you will lose some of the image as well as a certain amount of sharpness. Of course, you can re-sharpen but this also has its price - noise. If you're happy with the photo, don't let anyone tell you that you have to correct the distortion. The fact that you could use a program to address this point doesn't make it a must.
    Photography is a portal through which we are transported to other worlds

  • #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    314
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Berg View Post
    If the distortion bothers you enough, correct it. However, by doing so you will lose some of the image as well as a certain amount of sharpness. Of course, you can re-sharpen but this also has its price - noise. If you're happy with the photo, don't let anyone tell you that you have to correct the distortion. The fact that you could use a program to address this point doesn't make it a must.
    It is NOT a matter of whether the distortion bothers the photographer, it is whether it bothers the viewer. That is why it is and should be corrected in post.

    Cameron

  • #9
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    1,320
    Equipment
    Canon 5D mk II, EF 14mm f/2.8L II, TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II, EF 24-70mm f/2.8L, EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS, EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS, EF 135mm f/2L, EF 300mm f/2.8L IS, Speelite 430EX II, 5380EX II
    PHOTO EDITING OK
    The "shift" part of a tilt-shift lens can correct it in camera, and there are a few advantages to in-camera correction. When you use a transform tool in Photoshop the previously rectangular image will be turned into a trapezoid (keystone shape) to correct the image. The "wings" on the trapezoid then need to be cropped off to return the image to a rectangle. If there wasn't enough space left between the side of the subject (say a tall building) and the edge of the frame, then the crop might not work. With the tilt-shift, you're correcting the perspective and capturing a rectangular image with the correction already applied. So it's more of a "what you see is what you get". And of course the camera records the corrected image at native resolution.

    Unfortunately tilt-shift lenses are expensive. Software is usually more economical for most photographers.

    Images often have "lines" that guide the viewer around and this is often strong in architecture images. The "lean" of a building can create a diagonal which is deliberately placed as part of the frame dynamics (the book "The Photographer's Eye (subtitle "Composition and Design for Better Digital Photos") by Michael Freeman has some great examples of this.) In these cases, fixing the lean would be tragic.

    In the end, it boils down to this: WHY is the building leaning and is the lean adding to or taking away from the photo?
    Tim Campbell

  • #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    701
    Equipment
    I use 35mm film, instant film and digital cameras
    PHOTO EDITING NOT OK
    Quote Originally Posted by Cameron View Post
    It is NOT a matter of whether the distortion bothers the photographer, it is whether it bothers the viewer. That is why it is and should be corrected in post.

    Cameron
    Sometimes the aim might be to bother the viewer, to challenge their senses and question the assumptions they have of the world.

    Photographs are, like any other art form, open to interpretation and how they are likely to be received by the viewer is, of course, something the photographer will consider; but, ultimately, art is essentially a personal expression of its creater and as such how it is presented is a decision the artist must make for themselves.

    If you are a professional photographer who has been commissioned to put together a portfolio of desirable properties for an estate agent, then it is reasonable to assume they, the client (and the client's clients), will expect to see the lines of the buildings in the photos as straight as they appear to the eye when viewing the sites. Fair enough, the situation dictates what you should do.
    However, if you're a photographer putting work together for an exhibition of, say, light and lines,then you are free to chose whether you have straight or slanting walls, towers, poles, etc.

    It rather depends on your aims and objectives.

    I do not subcribe to prescriptive points of view.
    Photography is a portal through which we are transported to other worlds


  •  
    Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

    Remove Ads

    Sponsored Links

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •